Share This Page

Aguilera makes Jazz Fest debut

| Saturday, May 3, 2014, 1:45 p.m.
Barry Brecheisen/Invision/AP
Christina Aguilera performs at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on Friday, May 2, 2014.

NEW ORLEANS — Christina Aguilera gave her fans a little bit of jazz, a little bit of blues, and a lot of soul during her debut performance Friday at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

The very pregnant performer shimmied and danced her way through a litany of hits including “Lady Marmalade,” the LaBelle song she helped remake into a hit years ago; “Dirrty,” “Candyman,” “Ain't No Other Man,” “Beautiful,” “What a Girl Wants,” and her final song of the night, “Fighter.”

Morgan Griffith of Dallas said she came to Jazz Fest so she could hear Aguilera's voice live.

“I've seen her at the Super Bowl and in her movies, like ‘Burlesque,' and she's just an amazing performer. “She doesn't just sing. It's everything on cue: the dancers, the setup ... just everything.”

“She has such a strong voice,” added Griffith's friend, Courtney Vrij, also of Dallas.

Aguilera also sang covers of several songs, including “Moves Like Jagger,” by Maroon 5; “Whole Lotta Love,” by Led Zeppelin; B.B. King's “The Thrill is Gone;” “It's a Man's World,” by James Brown; and “At Last,” by Etta James.

The set included a special guest performance by Ian Axel of A Great Big World on “Say Something,” which featured Aguilera.

One of Aguilera's other “guests” was her unborn daughter, her second child, whom she already calls a “roadie.”

“This baby girl has already hit the stage in Malaysia,” she said in an email statement prior to her performance. “It's mama's job. We roll with it. She'll be listening to the concert from inside me. ... That's pretty special.”

The performer left the stage often for small wardrobe changes — mostly hats or head pieces. She also interspersed the set with lengthy introductions explaining what inspired her to sing a particular song. And she thanked the crowd several times.

“I love looking out at a crowd and seeing happy faces, smiling faces, drinking faces, smoking faces,” she said, drawing applause and laughter, “It's a good feeling to be a part of it.”

Festival producer Quint Davis said he hand-picks artists for the festival who he thinks will suit the experience. He called Aguilera “one of the great vocalists of our era.”

“That's what I look for: greatness,” he added.

Other performers Friday included soul great Chaka Khan, the rock group Alabama Shakes and Louisiana-based acts including the Charmaine Neville Band, Amanda Shaw and the Hot 8 Brass Band.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.