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Theater

Cirque's 'world-class performers' to dazzle Palace Theatre audience

| Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, 9:00 p.m.
Cirque D'Or appears Feb. 9 at the Palace Theatre.
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Cirque D'Or appears Feb. 9 at the Palace Theatre.
Zhang Qi, known as 'Kiki', has done acrobatics for more than 20 years. She joined the Cirque D'Or troupe in the Anhui Province of China when she was just 7 years old. She will perform with Cirque D'Or Feb. 9 at the Palace Theatre.
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Zhang Qi, known as 'Kiki', has done acrobatics for more than 20 years. She joined the Cirque D'Or troupe in the Anhui Province of China when she was just 7 years old. She will perform with Cirque D'Or Feb. 9 at the Palace Theatre.

Acrobatics has been a major part of Zhang Q for just about her entire life.

The 27-year-old performer, known to her audiences as Kiki, joined the Cirque D'Or troupe based in the Anhui Province of China when she was just 7 years old.

“This performance art requires so much commitment and dedication,” she says. “I have enjoyed learning many skills over the years as a professional acrobat and we continue to learn new things every day.”

Cirque D'Or will bring 25 professional acrobats, contortionists, balancing artists and other performance artists to Greensburg's Palace Theatre on Feb. 9 as part of its current North American tour.

“Most of us have been in the troupe for at least 15 to 20 years together, and we have become a very close family. We strive to always do our best in every performance, and I believe people will see our hard work come to life in Greensburg,” Kiki says.

One of her featured performances is an aerial act called “Silk Duet,” in which two acrobats perform a routine as lovers on suspended silks. She has been part of the featured act for more than 10 years and it is one of her favorite parts of the show.

“I think everybody will find it very beautiful,” she says.

Cirque D'Or, which means “Golden Circus,” according to tour manager and show host Lucas Case, will perform in 60 cities through the end of March on its current tour that began in Hawaii.

The troupe that evolved from the Golden Dragon Acrobats of China will be making its first appearance in Greensburg. The majority of the company's performers are in their 20s, with ages ranging from 15 to 30.

The production is a colorful, family friendly show that includes a combination of juggling, high-flying acts, silk aerialists and bicycle stunts. The tour manager says one of audiences' favorite parts of the troupe's performance is the hat juggling act that opens the show.

“It begins with some classy music and then starts to groove. It's really amazing and always fires up the crowd,” he says. “A lot of the contortion acts defy the laws of physics. When I say they're world-class performers, I'm not exaggerating.”

Candy Williams is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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