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Trailer arrives for 'Million Dollar Arm,' story of Pirates' Indian prospects

| Monday, Dec. 23, 2013, 12:30 p.m.
Jon Hamm (left) stars as sports agent JB Bernstein in Disney's 'Million Dollar Arm' with, from left, Madhur Mittal, Suraj Sharma and Pitobash.
Walt Disney Pictures
Jon Hamm (left) stars as sports agent JB Bernstein in Disney's 'Million Dollar Arm' with, from left, Madhur Mittal, Suraj Sharma and Pitobash.

The first trailer is out for “Million Dollar Arm,” the story of how two young men from India went from winning a reality show to being signed to major league contracts with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

The movie, which is due out on May 16, stars Jon Hamm as sports agent J.B. Bernstein, who with the help of venture capitalists hatched the idea for a contest to find the hardest thrower in India. More than 37,000 Indians tried out for the show in 2008, before the pool was cut to 30 contestants.

Rinku Singh won the contest and $100,000; Dinesh Patel was the runner-up. Both then came to the U.S. where they were briefly trained by Tom House (Bill Paxton), a former major league pitcher and University of Southern California pitching coach.

The Pirates signed both players. Singh, 23, who became the first Indian to appear in a minor league game, is still with the organization. The left-handed pitcher went 3-1 with a 3.00 ERA in 39 relief outings last season for the Pirates' Class-A affiliate, West Virginia Power, in Charleston. Patel was released by the club in 2010.

The majority of the film follows the events leading up to their signings but Pirates spokesman Brian Warecki says the club and Major League Baseball were consulted by the production company.

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