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Tenaska Westmoreland hires plant manager for natural gas station

Stephen Huba
| Monday, Oct. 30, 2017, 11:45 a.m.
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for support steel of a casing that will house steam generation pumps at the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station on Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. The natural-gas fired power plant is expected to open by December 2018 and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction workers prepare a concrete pad for support steel of a casing that will house steam generation pumps at the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station on Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. The natural-gas fired power plant is expected to open by December 2018 and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
Internal water lines are laid for fire hydrants at the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station in South Huntingdon Township on Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. The natural-gas fired power plant is expected to open by December 2018 and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Internal water lines are laid for fire hydrants at the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station in South Huntingdon Township on Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. The natural-gas fired power plant is expected to open by December 2018 and will supply power for up to 925,000 homes.
Work that started in Auust continues at the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station, near Smithton in South Huntingdon Township, on Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. The natural-gas fired power plant is expected to open by December 2018.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Work that started in Auust continues at the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station, near Smithton in South Huntingdon Township, on Wednesday, Feb.22, 2017. The natural-gas fired power plant is expected to open by December 2018.

About a year away from its opening, the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station in South Huntingdon has hired a plant manager.

Robert Mayfield, a Navy veteran, will oversee operations at the natural gas-fired power plant under construction near Smithton. He previously was plant manager at the Tenaska Virginia Generating Station near Scottsville, Va.

“I'm honored to lend my experience and expertise to Tenaska's newest power plant, the state-of-the-art Tenaska Westmoreland facility,” Mayfield said in a company news release. “I look forward to getting to know the community and establishing long-term relationships here.”

At Tenaska Westmoreland, he will be involved in staffing and employee training as the facility prepares for commercial operation in late 2018. Once the plant is operational, Mayfield will be in charge of day-to-day operations, including administrative, environmental, health, safety and community relations programs, the company said.

Before joining Tenaska, Mayfield served as operations manager for General Electric Contractual Services in Atlanta. He retired as a commander from the Navy after 27 years of service, working in operations and maintenance of power generation equipment, propulsion systems and computer systems for submarines.

Electricity generated at the 925-megawatt plant is expected to power an estimated 925,000 homes that are part of the PJM Interconnection grid, which coordinates power movement in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia and all or parts of 10 other states, plus Washington, D.C.

Tenaska, an energy company based in Omaha, Neb., formed Tenaska Pennsylvania Partners LLC to build, own and operate the Tenaska Westmoreland Generating Station.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-1280, shuba@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shuba_trib.

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