Share This Page

Roundup: Investors put money into stock funds; US Airways Presdient nets $1.37M; more

| Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Mutual funds have 2nd-biggest week ever

Investor deposits with global equity mutual funds in the first week of January were higher than any other period except one, a sign they may be coming back to stocks after withdrawing cash for the past six years. About $22 billion flowed into equity funds around the world in the week ended Jan. 9, according to data compiled by research firm EPFR Global going back to 1996. Emerging-market equity funds took in the most money on record. The MSCI All-Country World Index jumped 3.1 percent in the first week of 2013 and the Standard & Poor's 500 Index reached a five-year high yesterday on signs the global economy is gaining momentum. “An improving backdrop is causing investors to reappraise equities,” said Graham Bishop, an equity strategist at Exane BNP Paribas in London. “Equities are well placed to benefit as the recent flow data implies.”

US Airways' Kirby gains $1.37M

US Airways Group Inc. President Scott Kirby, who has helped lead the carrier's push for a merger with bankrupt AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, earned a $1.37 million profit from a sale of the company's stock. The disposal of 114,862 US Airways shares occurred on Jan. 8 when the stock hit the $15 trigger price set last year when Kirby created the so-called Rule 10b5-1 plan, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. The shares were valued at $3.10 when placed in the plan, the filing said.

Apple CEO: China biggest market

Apple expects China to overtake the United States as its biggest market, CEO Tim Cook told a Chinese government news agency. “China is currently our second-largest market. I believe it will become our first. I believe strongly that it will,” the Xinhua News Agency quoted Cook as saying. The report gave no details of when Cook thought China might pass the United States. Apple has said sales in China more than doubled in 2010 and 2011 though growth has slowed in the past year. Apple's iPhones, iPads and other gadgets are popular with China's highest-earning consumers but its fast-growing smartphone market is dominated by handsets that use rival Google Inc.'s Android system.

Other business news

• Oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. said the number of rigs actively exploring for oil and natural gas dropped by one for a second consecutive week to settle at 1,761. The Houston-based company said in its weekly report Friday that 1,323 rigs were exploring for oil and 434 for gas. Four were listed as miscellaneous. A year ago, Baker Hughes counted 1,987 working rigs. Pennsylvania lost six rigs while Colorado and Texas each dropped two. Arkansas and New Mexico remained unchanged.

• Bridgeway Capital, a community development financial institution based Downtown, said Friday it's expanding its microloan-making territory northward to Erie, Crawford, Mercer, Lawrence, Venango and Clarion counties. The microloans, whose maximum is $50,000, are backed by the Small Business Administration. Bridgeway Capital already makes microloans in Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler and Indiana counties.

• Susan Balla, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce Inc., will retire on Feb. 15 from the head of the organization, which represents businesses in 16 municipalities in the North Hills. Balla has led the group since October 2009, when it was formed from the merger of the Cranberry and Northern Allegheny County chambers of commerce.

— Staff and wire reports

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.