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College graduates' salaries up in 2012

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By Darrell Smith
Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

The new year is bringing good news for newly minted college graduates.

Class of 2012 graduates earned higher salaries on average than their 2011 predecessors — an increase of more than 3 percent, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, or NACE. The findings from NACE's January 2013 survey show the average starting salary for a 2012 graduate is $44,455, compared with $42,987 for 2011 grads.

“The encouraging news that the overall average salary for this group is 3.4 percent higher than the average salary for last year's class is bolstered by the fact that salaries have increased across all broad categories of majors,” the salary survey says.

The sharpest salary gains were found in education, where 2012 graduates' salaries at $40,668 were 5.4 percent higher than the average $38,581 earned by 2011 graduates.

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