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Business roundup

| Tuesday, June 11, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Beaver nuclear plant running at full power

Beaver Valley nuclear power station resumed 100 percent power on Monday afternoon, ending a nearly two-week shutdown at one of its two units, according to its owner, FirstEnergy Corp. Unit No. 2 went back online just after 5 p.m. Sunday, spokeswoman Jennifer Young said. The unit had been down since May 28 when sensors picked up small, but unusual, vibrations in the power generator. The company ramped up its production until it hit 100 percent about 2 p.m., Young said. Workers fixed the vibration problem — which turned out to be a result of slackened wires — and replaced two seals on coolant pumps connected to the nuclear reactor, according to the company and federal regulators. Company workers used the downtime to replace the parts because they had been working inefficiently, Young said.

Chrysler recalls 15,000 Darts

Chrysler is recalling about 15,000 Dodge Dart compact cars worldwide because the engines can stall in cold weather. The recall affects 2013 model year cars with 1.4-liter, four-cylinder engines and dual-clutch automatic transmissions. The company discovered the problem while testing a Dart that had been parked for eight hours in a room at 20 degrees. The car was then taken out of the room, and it stalled moments later, according to a statement from Chrysler, which owns the Dodge brand. After the incident, the company checked with dealers and found that some customers had a similar experience with the car. Further investigation traced the problem to the computer that controls the engine and transmission. Canadian safety regulators say the problem could cause a loss of power, increasing the risk of crash, injury or property damage. But Chrysler says it doesn't know of any crashes or injuries tied to the problem.

McDonald's: Dollar Menu, new items lifted sales

Cheap eats and new menu items helped McDonald's boost a key sales figure in May, bouncing back from a decline the previous month. The world's biggest hamburger chain on Monday said that global sales rose 2.6 percent at restaurants open at least a year, helped by an extra Friday in the month. In the United States, the figure rose 2.4 percent, as the Dollar Menu and its new chicken wraps and egg white breakfast sandwiches lifted results. In Europe, the figure rose 2 percent, as declines in Germany and France were offset by strong results in the United Kingdom and Russia.

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