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Next manufacturing boom could come from space

| Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, 5:09 p.m.
Eric Joyce (left), Archinaut project manager, and DeeJay Riley, engineer, work on the Archinaut, the Made In Space robot the company hopes to send into space to manufacture products in low Earth orbit. The robot will consist of a 3D printer that produces parts, and robotic arms that assemble those parts into a finished product. (Courtesy Made In Space)
Eric Joyce (left), Archinaut project manager, and DeeJay Riley, engineer, work on the Archinaut, the Made In Space robot the company hopes to send into space to manufacture products in low Earth orbit. The robot will consist of a 3D printer that produces parts, and robotic arms that assemble those parts into a finished product. (Courtesy Made In Space)

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — These days, it's hardly exotic to see a “made in China” sticker slapped on your favorite product. But what if that sticker said “made in space?”

A Mountain View-based startup this month revealed new breakthroughs in its quest to build in-space factories that will orbit the Earth and pump out products that are too difficult or expensive to make at home. The technology is expected to revolutionize space exploration by allowing scientists access to better tools in space, and also provide people on Earth with unique space-made products such as improved fiber optic cables.

“In-space manufacturing and assembling has been the stuff of science fiction and the dream of the industry for almost the entire existence of the industry,” said Made in Space CEO Andrew Rush, who hosted journalists and NASA representatives at his company's headquarters for a demo. “But now, for the first time, we're making these really transformative steps toward making that a reality.”

In June, Made in Space successfully completed the first test of its manufacturing equipment in a vacuum chamber that simulates the micro-gravity environment of space — a major milestone, Rush said. The company's partners at NASA hope to take that technology into orbit as early as 2020.

Made in Space's project is part of a broader trend toward the commercialization of space. As NASA prepares to retire the International Space Station in 2024, private companies like Axiom and Bigelow are rushing to take its place — the same way Elon Musk's SpaceX stepped in when NASA ended its Space Shuttle program in 2011.

Made in Space hopes to help turn those private space stations into manufacturing hubs, producing what Rush calls a “low Earth orbit economy.”

Today, most things that are used in space have to get there via rocket launch. That's expensive, slow, and subjects the payload to intense G-force during the ride. Within the next decade, Rush hopes to manufacture most satellites in space - eliminating the need for launches. Eventually, he hopes to use his company's technology to build human settlements on Mars.

In-space manufacturing also could have major implications for the search for life on other planets, said Steve Jurczyk, associate director of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate. Scientists can't launch a telescope into space that's big enough to produce high-quality, color images of planets that orbit other stars, Jurczyk said during the demo day. If that telescope instead could be built in space, scientists could use it to study the atmospheres of other planets and determine whether they could support life.

NASA is working with Made in Space on its in-space manufacturing project as part of a $20 million partnership.

Made in Space operates from an unassuming building in Moffett Field, an abandoned naval air base that now houses NASA's Ames Research Center and a cluster of private space-focused tech startups. That's where engineers perfected the Archinaut —basically a 3-D printer with robotic arms. The printer prints out beams and other pieces, and the robotic arms are designed to autonomously assemble them into, say, a piece of a space station.

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