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Share of health care costs rising for employees

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Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012, 4:28 p.m.

Pennsylvania employers are more likely to increase the portion of health insurance costs their employees pay rather than drop coverage, according to preliminary results from a national survey from benefits consulting firm Mercer.

J.T. Shilling, the business leader for Mercer's Pittsburgh and Cleveland offices, said 63 percent of the 127 employers in the state that were surveyed plan to increase cost sharing in 2013, compared with 43 percent nationally.

Meanwhile, only 6 percent of the Pennsylvania companies surveyed think they'll drop health insurance in 2014 when the biggest parts of federal health care reform go into effect. Shilling said 21 percent of companies surveyed nationally expect the Affordable Care Act will lead them to cancel health plans in 2014.

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