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Motorists on pace to spend a record sum on gasoline in 2012

| Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

The average price of a gallon of regular gasoline in the United States this year never reached the highs seen in 2008, when the all-time record of $4.114 was reached. The 2012 average never even climbed as high as it was last year, when it hit $3.965, according to the Energy Department.

But fuel prices have been so consistently high in 2012 that American motorists are on pace to spend more on gasoline this year — $483 billion, or $1.32 billion a day — than they ever have before, according to the Oil Price Information Service in New Jersey.

That would break the old record for the amount of money spent by Americans on gasoline, set last year, by about $12 billion. That's in spite of the fact that the U.S. average topped out this year at $3.941 a gallon back in April.

Analysts say the most remarkable thing is that high gasoline prices did not have the chilling effect on consumer spending that they did four years ago.

“Americans seem to have accepted the news on high fuel prices with aplomb,” said Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst for OPIS.

In Western Pennsylvania, the price for regular gasoline generally has been higher than the national average this year, according to weekly reports from AAA East Central.

For example, when the average price in Western Pennsylvania peaked at $3.98 a gallon in early April, the national average was $3.88. And the average on Tuesday was $3.62 a gallon in the region, 20 cents higher than the national figure.

Gasoline prices this year were driven, in part, by high oil prices. They were also affected by consistently high exports of U.S.-produced diesel and gasoline to customers overseas.

A third factor involved periodic regional spikes that helped keep the national average high.

The first of those spikes occurred in the Midwest, where petroleum pipeline ruptures and refinery outages kicked prices sharply higher.

The second occurred in October in California, where prices hit a new state record of $4.671 a gallon, sparking several calls for federal and state investigations of refinery practices.

More recently, damage from Hurricane Sandy along the Eastern Seaboard shut several refineries and led to temporary fuel rationing in New York and New Jersey.

These impacts canceled out the fact that U.S. demand for motor fuel, running at about 8.7 million barrels a day so far this year, is at its lowest level since 2001, Kloza said.

There is some good news. Fuel prices are expected to average about $3.44 a gallon in 2013, the Energy Department projects.

The Los Angeles Times andTrib Total Media staff writerAlex Nixon contributed to this report.

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