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Government moves against Nap Nanny over infant deaths

| Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

WASHINGTON — The government is taking action against the makers of a portable baby recliner called the Nap Nanny because of five infant deaths.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission filed an administrative complaint Wednesday alleging that the new model of the Nap Nanny, called the Chill, and two earlier versions “pose a substantial risk of injury and death to infants.”

The commission is seeking an order that would require Nap Nanny maker Baby Matters LLC of Berwyn in Chester County to notify the public about what the agency deems a serious product defect. The agency wants the company to offer consumers a full refund.

The first two versions of the foam recliner were recalled in July 2010 when the agency was aware of one death and 22 reports of infants hanging out or falling over the side of the Nap Nanny even though most of the infant had been placed in the recliner's harness. Since then, the agency has learned of four more deaths. Four are linked to the first versions of the recliner, and one to the newer model.

On its website, Baby Matters says that “Nap Nanny has gone out of business and therefore is no longer selling any product.” No returns, changes to recent orders or cancellations will be accepted, the website says.

In all, CPSC says it has received more than 70 reports of children nearly falling out of the recliner.

The commission filed the complaint after discussions with the company broke down over a recall plan.

The Nap Nanny was designed to mimic the curves of a baby car seat, elevating an infant slightly to help reduce reflux, gas, stuffiness or other problems.

Five thousand Nap Nanny Generation One and 50,000 Generation Two models were sold between 2009 and early 2012.

About 100,000 Chill models have been sold since January 2011.

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