TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

What CEOs want in new hires

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

Daily Photo Galleries

By Diane Stafford
Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2012, 8:56 p.m.
 

What kind of employees are employers looking for?

And how can human resource officials help?

Those two questions were chewed on along with the chicken at a recent Society for Human Resource Management chapter meeting.

The answers came from a panel of four Kansas City-area CEOs who represent a hospital, a bank, a manufacturer and a marketing agency.

In answer to the first question, the CEOs said they want:

• “Key people” who share their philosophies about managing and growing their operations.

• “Rainmakers” who produce revenue.

• “Workers who are willing to work” and show up every day.

• “People who are willing to change” and be flexible.

• “Nice people, because you can't train nice.”

• “Bright people.”

• “Team-oriented people.”

The executives answered the second question by telling the human resources professionals that it's their job to find and hire employees with those traits — and to put them in jobs that are the right fit.

The CEOs said HR departments also should provide training that “increases the value of the people we have.”

They told the HR folk to avoid getting bogged down in administrative details, that they have lawyers and accountants “to keep them out of trouble.” Rather, they said, their HR experts should understand their businesses and bring “operational value to the table.”

Those are tall orders. In the real world, HR departments get consumed with administrative details. There are plenty.

It's also true that many HR departments — not a revenue-producing unit — are understaffed for the company's payroll size. Many lack time or expertise to provide the ideal training or emotional hand-holding that some workers need to be productive.

CEOs rightly can expect HR professionals to be their “people people.” But there's a problem if CEOs cavalierly tell HR to handle their people issues without adequate funds or staffing to do it right.

Diane Stafford is the workplace and careers columnist at The Kansas City Star. Email dstafford@kcstar.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Drenching rains green pastures, bode well for cattle herd expansion in Great Plains
  2. Financial planning for disabled people a little-tapped field
  3. AT&T evolves beyond phones
  4. How to cover work history gaps
  5. Taxes matter in  fund investing, even when there’s no bill
  6. Keep pesky neighbors from stealing your Internet
  7. FAA: Cockpit email system reduces delays
  8. This robot is cute, artificially intelligent and employed
  9. Murray, Alpha notify West Virginia coal miners of layoffs
  10. Murray Energy expects to lay off as many as 1,800 more
  11. Pa. sees widespread job gains; jobless rate holds at 5.3%