Share This Page

Comcast considered name change in rebranding

| Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012, 6:08 p.m.

Even the Comcast name was on the table over the last year as the company considered a rebranding plan to communicate that it was a cable-TV provider and a media conglomerate through its NBC Universal subsidiary.

NBC wasn't considered, but other names were, D'Arcy Rudnay, Comcast's chief communications officer, said Tuesday afternoon in a 52nd-floor conference room.

The company ultimately decided to keep Comcast — a combination of “communications” and “broadcast” coined by company founder Ralph Roberts in the 1960s — with NBC's colorful peacock logo centered over it.

The font was specially created by the global design firm frog — that's right, lowercase “f” — that worked on Apple products in the 1980s.

Comcast Chief Executive Brian Roberts presented the new logo and website, www.comcastcorporation.com, in an internal meeting Monday at NBC headquarters in New York with 275 Comcast employees in attendance in NBC's Saturday Night Live studio. The employees were being recognized for restoring cable and Internet service in the Northeast after Superstorm Sandy.

Roberts, accompanied on stage by NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams and cable division head Neil Smit, said the new brand was a “great new image for the company.”

No longer solely a cable-TV company, Comcast has positioned itself at the intersection of technology and media, Rudnay said.

Comcast acquired a 51 percent interest in NBC Universal in early 2011 from General Electric and is expected to eventually buy the other 49 percent, also from GE.

Comcast will continue to market its cable, high-speed Internet, and phone services under the Xfinity name, and the new logo will reflect the corporate parent, now one of the largest companies in the United States, with more than 100,000 employees.

Xfinity will remain on the company's ubiquitous white service vans, but the new Comcast lettering with the NBC peacock will be painted on the doors.

“We are a whole company and not a company of parts,” Roberts said, referring to the combination of the two main business lines, Comcast and NBC, in the logo.

The company developed the new content-rich website — 2,500 pages and 100 videos available to the public — for those curious about Comcast.

It will be managed in Philadelphia and contain movie trailers and information about the businesses and history of NBC, Comcast, and Universal, the movie studio.

Before launching this website, Comcast's main website, www.comcast.com, was aimed at retail customers. It will remain focused on retail. That site had 29 million visitors in November.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.