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Subway 'crisis': Is footlong sub really 11 inches?

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

What's in an inch? Apparently, enough missing meat, cheese and tomatoes to cause an uproar.

Subway, the world's largest fast food chain with 37,000 locations, is facing criticism since an Australian man posted a picture on the company's Facebook page of one of its famous footlong sandwiches next to a tape measure that seems to show it's just 11 inches.

More than 100,000 people have “liked” or commented on the photo, which has the caption “Subway pls respond.” Lookalike pictures have popped up elsewhere on Facebook.

By Thursday afternoon, the picture was no longer visible on Subway's Facebook page, which has 19.8 million fans. A spokesman for Subway, based in Milford, Conn., said the length of its sandwiches can vary slightly when its bread, which is baked at each Subway location, is not made to the chain's exact specifications.

“We are reinforcing our policies and procedures in an effort to ensure our offerings are always consistent,” Subway said in an e-mailed statement.

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