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200 homes planned for Pine

| Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

A developer with Irish roots plans to build a major housing development on a 276-acre site in Pine Township to be called Emerald Fields.

Pat Minnock of Minnock Construction Co. in Ross will build on property acquired by his father, the late Patrick Minnock, in 1977 when he realized a lifelong dream of returning to farm life he left in Ireland.

The roads and facilities built on the property will reflect the Irish heritage of the Minnocks, officials said. On the property, Patrick Minnock and his sons tended 32 head of cattle, horses and rolling fields of oats and hay.

Construction is expected to begin this summer by Pat Minnock's Pine Development Co. Planned are 198 new stand-alone single-family houses to be built, joining three existing houses on the site, said John Schleicher of Gibson Thomas Engineering Co. Inc. of the North Hills, the project's engineer.

Minnock could not be reached for comment.

Upscale housing in the development will be built in five phases, consisting of 40 to 50 lots per phase, he said, Pine officials said minimum lot size will be one-half acre, and 120 acres will remain open at the site, which is adjacent to Mt. Pleasant and Franklin roads.

Two recreational areas will be included, with a larger site containing a play field, picnic area and basketball court to be included in the first phase, Schleicher said. The second area will include a play field for younger children and a picnic area.

A public hearing on a proposed Planned Residential Development zoning for the property, which will include a 201-lot subdivision, will be held by the township at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 19 in the Pine Community Center, Pine Park Drive.

Sam Spatter is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7843 or sspatter@tribweb.com.

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