| Business

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

GM lowers Malibu prices to compete with Camry on Web

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

GM $28.57 +$0.10

at close on FRIDAY

By Tim Higgins C.2013 Bloomberg News
Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

General Motors Co., in an effort to make its Chevrolet Malibu more appealing to online car shoppers, lowered the car's price by as much as $770 to compete with better-selling midsize sedans. The segment includes five of the 20 most popular vehicles.

The entry-level Malibu's starting price was reduced by $345 to $21,995, which excludes an $810 freight charge, GM said. The Toyota Camry, the top-selling car, begins at $22,235 before a $795 handling fee, according to Toyota Motor Corp.'s website.

Malibu U.S. sales rose 7.8 percent in January while the Camry increased 13 percent, according to researcher Autodata Corp.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Sluggish wage growth may sap retail spending during winter holidays
  2. Last-minute China worries derailed Fed’s rate hike plans, minutes reveal
  3. Volkswagen executive Horn sidesteps blame in emissions scandal
  4. CMU showcases its lengthy list of fledgling companies at venture event
  5. Other segments nudge Alcoa to slim profit
  6. Fed insight gives stocks room to run; S&P 500 regains 2,000 mark
  7. Rice, Gulfport team on Utica shale pipeline system
  8. PNC fined for paperwork errors on municipal bond offerings
  9. Credit bureau Experian keeps info on cellular firm’s customers
  10. Alcoa supplying parts for military jets under $1.1B pact with Lockheed Martin
  11. Energy efficiency goes mainstream with help of regulations, demand