TribLIVE

| Business

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Free version of Nitro Reader stacks up against paid pdf programs

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Noah Matthews
Thursday, March 21, 2013, 6:03 p.m.
 

Sometimes the better things in life are free. That's especially true of a pdf program called Nitro Reader. It's free, as is its better-known cousin, Adobe Reader. For the latter, there's probably not a computer in North America and points west that does not have Adobe Reader installed. But folks ought to give Nitro Reader a run for the money, too.

A pdf — portable document file — can be opened and viewed on most common operating systems. Create a pdf on a Mac, and you can open it on a PC running any version of Windows. It's an industry standard.

The problem with Adobe Reader is it does only what its name promises: It will read pdf files, but it will not create them unless you upgrade to the paid version. Nitro Reader not only can create pdf files, it can help you annotate them, attach yellow sticky notes to your work, and even let you make corrections and additions to your work. Adobe Reader, which has a slicker interface, will let you attach yellow notes and type a signature that you can attach to your file.

Creating a pdf file is as simple as dragging and dropping the file onto the Nitro Reader desktop icon. After that, you can annotate, add text, email or bounce a rubber ball on your PC. Forget I said that. Adobe Reader gives you only five free pdf's. (In my test run, however, it could not convert a Microsoft 2010 file to a pdf.)

If you like what you see in the free version, a $99 upgrade will let you edit text, create Word files from pdf's and more. Adobe Reader has an upgrade version for about the same price but charges a yearly subscription fee.

Either way, the paid versions are worth the price. Nitro Reader has excellent tutorials, including videos, and the help files are numerous and directions are easy to follow.

But for free, Nitro Reader is worth considering. It can be downloaded at www.nitroreader.com. Adobe Reader can be downloaded at Adobe.com.

• Tip of the week: Most financial institutions offer statements as pdf's. They're easy to download and even print out. You can change the file name to describe it more fully by doing a “save as.” If you back up important files, drop the files into appropriate folders in your cloud backup program.

Noah Matthews is a writer for McClatchy-Tribune News Service.

-

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Small business hangs on fate of Export-Import Bank
  2. $2-per-gallon gas expected by year’s end, but not in Western Pa.
  3. FirstEnergy to build coal waste processing facility in Beaver County
  4. Chevy tweaks its truck remake
  5. Muni bond funds stressed
  6. Jaguar XJ flagship struggles to keep pace
  7. Insurers: F-150’s aluminum costly to repair
  8. Weak earnings drag energy sector lower
  9. Trib 30 index slips in July; 29 percent drop makes ATI biggest loser
  10. Wages, benefits stagnant, U.S. says
  11. 3 vehicles to keep an eye on for 2016