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Retailers to settle 'faux' fur changes

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

The FTC said Tuesday that Neiman Marcus and two other retailers have agreed to settle charges that they claimed certain products were made of “faux” fur when they actually contained real fur.

In addition to the upscale department store operator, the retailers include Inc. and Eminent Inc., doing business as Revolve Clothing.

The Federal Trade Commission said the companies also violated federal laws by not naming the animal that the fur came from.

The FTC also charged that The Neiman Marcus Group Inc. claimed that a rabbit fur product had mink fur, and failed to disclose where the fur came from for three fur products.

Under the proposed settlement, the retailers would be prohibited from violating the laws for 20 years.

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