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Stocks dip as manufacturing growth slows

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By The Associated Press
Monday, April 1, 2013, 6:24 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — The stock market got off to a slow start in April, edging lower after the Standard & Poor's 500 index eclipsed its all-time high last week.

The main catalyst was a slowdown in manufacturing growth last month. The decline in the Institute for Supply Management's benchmark manufacturing index for March was worse than economists had forecast. Stocks started falling shortly after the report came out at 10 a.m. and stayed lower the rest of the day.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed 5.69 points, or 0.04 percent, lower at 14,572.85. The Standard & Poor's 500 index dropped 7.02 points, or 0.5 percent, to 1,562.17.

Industrial companies fell 1 percent, the most in the S&P. 3M, which makes Post-it notes, industrial products and construction materials, fell 66 cents, or 0.6 percent, to $105.65. Caterpillar, a maker of construction and mining equipment, dropped $1.33, or 1.5 percent, to $85.64.

Investors have raised their expectations for the economy as the market has climbed this year, said JJ Kinahan, chief derivatives strategist at TD Ameritrade. The Dow is up 11.2 percent in 2013; the S&P, 9.5 percent.

“The numbers have to be outstanding in order to drive the market higher,” Kinahan said. “It's a different mindset when we're at these levels.”

The S&P 500 closed the first quarter at an all-time high of 1,569.19, surpassing its previous record close of 1,565.15 set on Oct. 9, 2007.

The index has recaptured all of its losses from the financial crisis and the Great Recession.

The Dow broke through its previous all-time high on March 5.

The market has risen this year because of optimism that housing is recovering and that employers are starting to hire again. Strong company earnings and continuing stimulus from the Federal Reserve also have increased demand for stocks.

Small stocks fared worse than large ones Monday.

The Russell 2000, a benchmark of small-company stocks, fell 1.3 percent to 938.78, paring its gain for the year to 10.5 percent. It was the index's biggest decline in more than a month. The Nasdaq composite fell 28.35 points, or 0.9 percent, to 3,239.17.

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