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Report: Richest 7% richer in recovery

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

The richest Americans got richer during the first two years of the economic recovery while average net worth declined for the other 93 percent of households, saida report released Tuesday.

The upper 7 percent of households owned 63 percent of the nation's total household wealth in 2011, up from 56 percent in 2009, said the report from the Pew Research Center, which analyzed new Census Bureau data released last month.

The main reason for the widening wealth gap is that affluent households typically own stocks and other financial holdings that increased in value, while the less wealthy tend to have more of their assets in their homes, which haven't rebounded.

from the plunge in home values, the report said.

Tuesday's report is the latest to point up financial inequality that has been growing among Americans for decades, a development that helped fuel the Occupy Wall Street protests.

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