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FDA detains imports of Mexican cucumbers

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

The Food and Drug Administration is detaining imports of cucumbers from a Mexican company because they were linked to salmonella illnesses in 18 states. The FDA placed the restrictions against Daniel Cardenas Izabal and Miracle Greenhouse of Culiacán, Mexico. The alert means the United States won't accept the imports unless the company can show testing that proves the cucumbers are safe.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday that 73 people may have been sickened by the cucumbers.

Salmonella can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever within a few days of eating a contaminated product. Salmonella can be life-threatening to those with weakened immune systems.

The cucumbers were distributed by Tricar Sales, Inc. of Rio Rico, Arizona. California reported the most illnesses, with 28 people sickened.

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