TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Appeals court strikes down union poster rule

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

By The Associated Press
Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

A federal appeals court has struck down a National Labor Relations Board rule that would have required millions of businesses to put up posters informing workers of their right to form a union.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said the board went too far in trying to force employers to display the posters or face charges of committing an unfair labor practice.

The ruling is a victory for business groups. They sued to block the rule, calling the posters too one-sided in favor of unionization. And it's another blow to labor unions who hoped the posters would help them boost falling membership.

The rule was supposed to take effect last year, but the appeals court had blocked that from happening until legal questions were resolved.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Crazy Mocha owner likes comfort, says shrewd decisions foster growth
  2. Farm use of drones to take off as feds loosen restrictions
  3. Investors shy from Israeli drugmaker Teva amid uncertain Mylan takeover
  4. After years of downsizing, big houses make comeback
  5. Atlantic City on hot streak with non-gambling ventures
  6. No more ‘roar’ as famed trading pits come to an end
  7. New J.C. Penney CEO comes from middle-income America
  8. Crude oil tumble signals low gasoline prices this fall
  9. Floating homes offer ‘affordable’ option in San Francisco area
  10. Corporate America speaking out on social issues, getting results
  11. Pittsburgh’s tech startup activity rates last of 40 metro areas in report