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Appeals court strikes down union poster rule

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

A federal appeals court has struck down a National Labor Relations Board rule that would have required millions of businesses to put up posters informing workers of their right to form a union.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said the board went too far in trying to force employers to display the posters or face charges of committing an unfair labor practice.

The ruling is a victory for business groups. They sued to block the rule, calling the posters too one-sided in favor of unionization. And it's another blow to labor unions who hoped the posters would help them boost falling membership.

The rule was supposed to take effect last year, but the appeals court had blocked that from happening until legal questions were resolved.

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