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Buffett meets with young entrepreneurs

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By The Associated Press
Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

Billionaire Warren Buffett spent Monday listening to business pitches from a select group of children, but the ideas aren't likely to generate new acquisitions for Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway conglomerate.

The youngsters, who are between 7 and 16, are finalists in a contest tied to “The Secret Millionaire's Club,” a cartoon narrated by Buffett that teaches children about finance. The cartoon airs on the Hub cable network and online at www.smckids.com.

Five children and three teams were flown to Omaha to present their ideas to Buffett and the judges. The finalists are from Maryland, Maine, Texas, New Jersey, Ohio, Kentucky and Washington.

The winning individual and team each receive $5,000. Runners-up get $500.

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