TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

NASCAR fans entice automakers

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

By Mark Phelan
Saturday, June 29, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

When Jeff and Jimmie, Carl and Kyle, and Dale and Danica rolled into Michigan this month, 100,000-odd fans, a few million TV viewers, and megabucks of automakers' advertising and marketing money came with them.

NASCAR, America's dominant racing series, is flush with the success of its new car, which has rewarded Ford, Chevrolet and Toyota with exciting races since it debuted in Daytona, Fla., in March. Chrysler withdrew from NASCAR this year after Roger Penske's racing team dropped its Dodge brand to race in Fords this year. Chrysler is expected to re-enter the series when it has a deal with another competitive team.

“NASCAR's reach is unlike any other form of racing. It has 75 million fans — one-third of the U.S. adult population,” Jamie Allison, Ford's director of motorsports, told me. Ford's research shows that more than a third of the people planning to buy a car at any given time are NASCAR fans.

“It makes sense to be part of a sport that's closely followed by millions of American fans,” said Leslie Unger, Toyota's national motorsports manager. “NASCAR's fan base is very brand-driven and loyal.”

There was trouble in the fan base in the past several years, though. The Great Recession and an unpopular car design cut into attendance at races, TV ratings and sponsorship money.

NASCAR and the automakers created a strategy to revitalize the sport in a meeting at the Westin Hotel in Detroit in 2010. The automakers wanted race cars with technology and designs more like the cars they sold.

“We got back to the idea of stock car racing,” said Kim Brink, NASCAR vice president of marketing.

They early results are promising. The new car-insiders call it “Gen 6” because it's the sixth-generation car in NASCAR's history — looks a lot like the automakers' production models. NASCAR also updated its technical formula to more closely resemble production models. Its cars now have fuel-injected engines that run ethanol biofuel.

“Demonstrating that the vehicles on the track are relevant to what we have in the showroom is very important,” said Jim Campbell, Chevrolet boss of motorsports and performance vehicles. “The TV ratings and attendance this year show movement in the right direction.”

NASCAR says the average race weekend draws 100,000 fans. The TV broadcast of its showcase event, the Daytona 500, drew more viewers than the two NCAA Final Four basketball games. Eight of the first 13 races this year met or exceeded last year's TV rating. The first 13 races averaged 7.7 million viewers.

Every track features an area like a carnival midway, where manufacturers stage events and showcase their vehicles and technology. Drivers — many of whom have feverish fan bases — also interact with fans at the manufacturers' exhibits.

“Customer awareness, consideration, shopping and purchases all rise with success in NASCAR,” according to Ford's research, Allison said.

Mark Phelan is the Detroit Free Press auto critic. He can be reached at mmphelan@freepress.com.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Faulty air bags in 30M vehicles
  2. Toyota Yaris adds French flair for ’15
  3. Mini goes mainstream
  4. Amazon investors’ patience wears thin
  5. First Niagara sets aside $45 million
  6. Motoring Q&A: ‘Check engine’ light doesn’t reset itself
  7. Bond mutual funds continue to carry their weight
  8. Sell-off reins in complacency
  9. Stocks rise broadly on earnings; Amazon sinks
  10. Calgon Carbon poised for explosive growth
  11. World’s 1st carbon capture power plant switches on in Canada
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.