TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Bernanke exit could complicate Fed's pullback

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

By The Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, June 25, 2013, 6:42 p.m.

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve expects to start slowing its bond-buying program this year just before it might need to manage another major transition that could spook investors: the likely exit of Chairman Ben Bernanke.

Bernanke is expected to step down in January. By then, financial markets will likely be absorbing a pullback in the Fed's bond purchases, which helped push long-term interest rates to record lows. Bernanke said last week that the Fed expects to slow its bond-buying later this year — and end it next year — if it thinks the economy can manage without it.

Bernanke hasn't said he'll leave in January, when his second term ends. But he's widely expected to step down then. Among several possible successors, most Fed watchers think the leading candidate is Vice Chair Janet Yellen.

As chairman, Yellen would likely aim to carry on Bernanke's policies. Even so, economists say a shift in leadership at such a delicate time might rattle investors.

“We know for sure now that Bernanke is a lame duck,” said Sung Won Sohn, an economics professor at California State University. “The leadership change at the Fed will add to the uncertainty in the markets at a time when the Fed is trying to navigate the transition from easy money to a less accommodative stance.”

Even before he leaves, the expectation that Bernanke has just a few months left as chairman could raise doubts about his policies, even though Yellen would be expected to push the same policies.

Investors' panicky response since Bernanke said the Fed will likely slow its stimulus later this year — if the economy is sturdy enough then — showed what could go wrong if a leadership transition is poorly managed.

The possible overlap between a Fed pullback in bond purchases and a new chairman “will compound the uncertainty and possible market volatility,” said Brian Bethune, an economics professor at Gordon College in Wenham, Mass.

Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics, said the Fed probably will learn from the distress it caused investors with Wednesday's word of a likely pullback in bond purchases this year. Many investors had thought — or hoped — the Fed would wait longer.

“They went too far and too fast,” Zandi said.

Most economists say the administration will strive to avoid any surprises in its handling of Bernanke's expected exit. Yellen is seen as a comforting choice, given that she's considered a Bernanke ally who has held the No. 2 post at the Fed since October 2010, said Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. More women seize opportunities to start businesses
  2. Investment in Western Pa. startups reaches 5-year high
  3. Lawsuit challenges Hollywood standard of unpaid internships
  4. Meat prices drain barbecue budgets
  5. Record cold facilitates coal’s comeback
  6. Pa. unemployment rate falls to lowest since 2008; 12,000 more enter workforce
  7. Salad dressing company manages growth
  8. Chocolate prices expected to soar as ingredients grow more expensive
  9. Pandora sued by record companies
  10. Squeezed by competition, Chobani to expand offerings
  11. Low pay, commutes among top stressors
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.