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USDA tries strategy to stem glut of sugar imports

| Saturday, July 27, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

WASHINGTON — U.S. sugarcane and sugar beet farmers are bracing for a flood of imported sugar from Mexico. Record production and imports are poised to sweeten the market a bit too much.

“This is a lot of sugar for our country to cope with,” said Jack Roney, the director of economics and policy analysis at the American Sugar Alliance, an industry group of sugar producers. “Prices are dropping to levels not seen since the 1980s, and the USDA is trying to avoid the consequences of that catastrophe.”

To deal with the glut, the Department of Agriculture took the unusual step of retiring sugar-import credits and purchasing more than 100,000 tons of sugar, which allowed it to take 330,000 tons of surplus sugar off the market.

The plan, which cost $43.8 million, weaved through a maze of sugar policy, transferring purchased sugar from the Agriculture Department to refiners in an attempt to lower foreign imports. In return, refiners surrendered import credits that were awarded to allow them to bring in sugar from overseas.

The Agriculture Department expects the plan to save it an estimated $66.9 million by avoiding loan forfeiture costs from its sugar loan program. But many surrounding the industry say the move doesn't make up for what they charge is outdated policy.

Mexico's recent sugar surplus is causing problems for the U.S. market because that country has unlimited access to the U.S. market, because of provisions that are part of the North American Free Trade Agreement. A June Agriculture Department report predicts that Mexico will export its record sugar surplus to the United States, shipping more than 1.9 million tons into a saturated market this year.

“It's really become one market only separated by the costs of moving product around,” said Tom Earley, vice president of Agralytica, a Washington food and agriculture consultancy.

Couple the solid season in Mexico with what Agralytica says is another strong crop in the United States, and domestic prices are at prolonged lows.

Sugar prices are nearing levels unseen since the 1980s. Prices have fallen to 16 cents per pound for raw sugar. U.S. prices peaked at an average of 38 cents per pound in 2011, after having fallen to 18 cents in 2000.

Protecting the domestic market from heavily subsidized foreign sugar producers — such as those in Mexico, where the government owns a 20 percent stake in the sector — is a priority for the American Sugar Alliance.

“We have a U.S. sugar policy for one reason only, and that's foreign subsidization,” said Phillip Hayes, the alliance's director of communications. Hayes said the subsidization had led to the record supplies and artificially depressed prices of the current market.

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