TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

BlackBerry founders Lazaridis, Fregin consider buying struggling smartphone maker

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

By The Associated Press
Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

TORONTO — BlackBerry founders Mike Lazaridis and Douglas Fregin are weighing taking over the distressed smartphone company as it searches for a savior.

Lazaridis said Thursday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that he and Fregin are looking to potentially acquire the 92 percent of the shares they don't own, either by themselves or with other interested parties. They have hired Goldman Sachs and Centerview Partners to help them explore options.

The filing said Lazaridis and Fregin own 8 percent of BlackBerry.

Their announcement is the latest sign of investor interest in BlackBerry after the company started a review to consider a possible sale or breakup of its operations. The Canadian company announced last month that Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd., which owns close to 10 percent of the company, signed a letter of intent that “contemplates” buying BlackBerry for $9 a share, or $4.7 billion. Fairfax, BlackBerry's largest shareholder, is trying to attract other investors. Private equity firm Cerberus is also interested in looking at Blackberry's books as a step toward a possible bid.

The stock is trading below Fairfax's tentative offer on fears that the deal won't go through or that the final price will be lower. Shares of the company rose 9 cents, or 1.1 percent, to $8.20 on Thursday.

The BlackBerry, pioneered in 1999, was once the dominant smartphone for on-the-go business people and other consumers. It could be so addictive that it was nicknamed “the CrackBerry.” But then came a new generation of competing smartphones, starting with Apple's iPhone in 2007.

The BlackBerry suddenly looked ancient. Its sales and market share shrank, and it lost billions in market value.

This year's much-delayed debut of the BlackBerry 10 system and the fancier devices that use it was supposed to rejuvenate the brand and lure customers. It did not work. Waterloo, Ontario-based BlackBerry recently announced 4,500 layoffs, or 40 percent of its global workforce, and reported a quarterly loss of nearly $1 billion.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Mortgage rate slide’s impact could be minimal
  2. Falling fuel prices help airlines — not fliers
  3. PUC approves Columbia Gas pipeline extensions program for homeowners
  4. World’s 1st carbon capture power plant switches on in Canada
  5. Toy sellers to enhance marketing as holidays approach
  6. Rule to close coal royalty loophole
  7. Chevron puts $20M into educating, training Appalachian workers
  8. Education Management removes itself from Nasdaq listing
  9. EQT Corp. boosts profits despite lower gas prices
  10. Stocks jump on strong earnings, led by 3M, Caterpillar
  11. Aesynt CEO gets technology council honors
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.