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Transgender employees vie for health care benefits

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

WASHINGTON — When Koset Surakomol decided to have a sex change operation, the company she worked for told her co-workers that the man they had labored alongside for a dozen years should be addressed as a woman going forward.

EMC Corp.'s support didn't end there: The data storage company paid tens of thousands of dollars for her to undergo hormone therapy, breast augmentation and facial contouring. It also will foot the bill later this year when Surakomol has the operation that will complete her transformation — a benefit EMC began offering in 2007.

“I got no bad reactions, no cold shoulders,” said Surakomol, an information technology engineer. “All I heard was: ‘This is wonderful.' ”

It's a story that would have been unheard of a decade ago. EMC, which has 60,000 employees, is one of a growing number of Fortune 500 companies expanding their health care benefits to meet the needs of workers who have gender dysphoria, the medical term for those who identify themselves as the opposite gender that they were assigned at birth.

Despite the gains in coverage for these transgender employees, many companies are unwilling to speak publicly about their benefits. But Delia Vetter, director of benefits at Hopkinton, Mass.-based EMC, said, “Everyone has a right to be naturally happy.”

From Apple to General Mills, nearly one-fourth of Fortune 500 companies cover medical expenses associated with transgender care, according to gay and transgender rights group Human Rights Campaign. That's up from 19 percent last year.

When the group began tracking transgender benefits in 2002, no Fortune 500 companies offered them.

Corporate America's outreach to transgender workers points to the increasing visibility of a group once relegated to society's fringes. Recently, more than a dozen states revised anti-discrimination laws to include transgender people. Meanwhile, transgender officials have raised the group's profile by winning elected office and landing appointments in the Obama administration.

The trend shows how much companies want their workplaces to be perceived as welcoming and progressive. Since the Human Rights Campaign began grading companies on the inclusiveness of their benefits for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender employees, many companies have beefed up their benefits for those groups.

Beginning in 2011, companies could maintain a coveted 100 percent rating on the group's Corporate Equality Index only by offering at least one insurance plan covering up to $75,000 worth of counseling, hormone therapy and sexual reassignment surgery — the medical term for a sex change operation. The number of Fortune 500 companies meeting the requirement jumped to 121 this year from 39 in 2011.

“Companies are recognizing that ... in order to remain competitive in corporate America, you can't offer discriminatory plans,” said Jennifer Levi, a professor at the Center for Gender and Sexuality Studies at Western New England University in Springfield, Mass.

While more companies offer transgender benefits, most government programs like Medicare and Medicaid classify sexual reassignment surgery as cosmetic or experimental and do not cover it.

But President Obama's health care overhaul could expand benefits for transgender people. While the law doesn't require coverage of sexual reassignment surgery per se, it's expected to lower barriers for other forms of care.

Starting in 2014, insurers, hospitals and doctors that receive federal dollars won't be allowed to deny coverage to patients with pre-existing conditions, including gender dysphoria. Since most U.S. insurers and hospitals receive federal payments, they will be subject to the requirement.

For most corporations, the cost of adding transgender care is negligible because few people will need it. The amount varies based on the company's size, insurance offerings and other factors.

According to one estimate by Jamison Green & Associates, a transgender benefit consulting firm, a company with 200,000 employees would have two people undergo sexual reassignment surgery in roughly 5 years.

Still, most private health insurance offered by employers excludes coverage for transgender-related care.

Jamison Green, a transgender man who owns the benefit consulting firm, said many companies are not aware that the insurance they have purchased excludes treatments for transgender employees. Green said he walks employers through the process of removing those exclusions.

“The company has to give a clear directive to their provider: ‘We really do want a policy that has these exclusions removed,' ” said Green, who lives outside San Francisco.

 

 
 


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