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California inmates learn tech from Silicon Valley pros

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

SAN QUENTIN, Calif. — The budding entrepreneurs wear blue sweatpants labeled “prisoner” and huge, flapping blue shirts. Their doors are triple locked, and lunch is a stale peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Complicating matters, participants in this growing Silicon Valley startup incubator are barred from the Internet.

Nonetheless, the program, started by successful tech entrepreneurs for inmates north of San Francisco in the decaying San Quentin State Prison, has expanded, and a new session began last month in the gritty, downtown Los Angeles Twin Towers Correctional Facility.

The reason they're growing is simple: Graduates, now trickling out of the penal system, are landing real jobs at real dot-coms.

The rigorous, six-month training teaches carefully selected inmates the ins and outs of designing and launching technology firms, using local experts as volunteer instructors.

“We believe that when incarcerated people are released into the world, they need the tools to function in today's high-tech, wired world,” said co-founder Beverly Parenti, who with her husband, Chris Redlitz, has started thriving companies, including AdAuction, the first online media exchange.

The pair were Silicon Valley pioneers in the 1990s, and they tap their many high-level connections to help with the prison program. They started the program after Redlitz was invited into San Quentin in 2011 for a guest lecture and was overwhelmed by the inmates' desire to learn.

“I figured, ‘We work with young entrepreneurs every day. Why not here?' ” he said.

After discussions with prison administrators, Parenti and Redlitz decided to add a prison-based firm to their portfolio, naming it for the precarious journey from prison to home: The Last Mile.

Now during twice-a-week evening lessons, students — many locked up before smartphones or Google existed — practice tweeting, brainstorm new companies and discuss business books assigned as homework. Banned from the Internet to prevent networking with other criminals, they take notes on keyboard-like word processors or with pencil on paper.

The program is still “bootstrapping,” as its organizers say, with just 12 graduates in its first two years and a few dozen in classes in San Quentin and Twin Towers. But the five graduates released so far are working in the tech sector.

They are guaranteed paid internships if they can finish the rigorous training program, which requires prerequisite courses, proven social skills and a lifetime oath to lead by positive example.

“This program will go a long way to not only providing these guys with jobs, but it is my hope that they hire people like them who have changed their lives and are now ready to contribute to society, pay taxes, follow the law, support their families,” said Matthew Cate, the former California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation director who approved the training course. “All those things contribute to the economy.”

 

 
 


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