TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Google moves from Glass to contact lenses

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

By The Los Angeles Times
Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

Google Inc. is searching for a better way for millions of diabetics to manage their disease by developing a contact lens that monitors glucose levels in tears.

The contact lenses are the latest project from Google's secretive X lab, which came up with the Internet-connected eyewear Glass.

The “smart” contact lens uses a tiny wireless chip and miniature glucose sensor that is folded into two layers of soft contact lens material.

Google said it is in discussions with the Food and Drug Administration, but the contact lenses could be years from reaching the public.

The prototype can generate a reading once per second, which could be very helpful for diabetics who must keep close tabs on their blood sugar and adjust their dose of insulin.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Pennsylvania shale gas producers received hundreds of environmental citations in 4 years, PennEnvironment says
  2. Yahoo to spin off Alibaba shares
  3. U.S. Steel has 1st profitable year since 2008
  4. Obamacare enrollment up in Pennsylvania
  5. MSA Safety products in demand to protect workers in dangerous jobs
  6. SEC alleges BNY Mellon bribed foreign investors by handing internships to their relatives
  7. U.S. Steel warns it may lay off almost 2,000 workers in Alabama, Texas
  8. Mylan loses Supreme Court fight over multiple sclerosis drug
  9. Drillers bid millions for oil, gas beneath West Virginia public lands
  10. Energy companies vie for experienced workers with skills in high demand
  11. Drops in gasoline prices won’t likely last, analysts say