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FAA declares Boeing 787's design, manufacture safe

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, March 20, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

Boeing's design and manufacture of its cutting-edge 787 jetliner is safe despite the plane's many problems since its rollout, including a fire that forced a redesign of the plane's batteries, according to a report issued jointly Wednesday by the Federal Aviation Administration and the aircraft maker.

The yearlong review concluded “the aircraft was soundly designed, met its intended safety level, and that the manufacturer and the FAA had effective processes in place to identify and correct issues that emerged before and after certification,” the agency said in a statement.

The report made seven recommendations for further improvements by Boeing and FAA.

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta asked for the review in January 2013 after a lithium-ion battery caught fire on a 787 parked at Logan International Airport in Boston. A battery aboard another 787 failed less than two weeks later.

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