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By Bloomberg News
Saturday, April 5, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

Amazon.com Inc. debuted a device that customers can use to add items to a shopping list by scanning barcodes or speaking the name of the product, in the e-commerce company's latest push into consumer hardware.

Users can push a microphone button on the device, called the Dash, and say “chocolate chips” or “guitar strings” to have an item in Amazon's online store automatically added to their shopping carts, according to the company's website. Or, customers can press a button to scan barcodes on jugs of milk or bottles of liquid soap when they're about to run out of the product.

The goods can then be delivered the next day via Amazon Fresh, a grocery-delivery service the company has started expanding beyond its home base of Seattle to cities including San Francisco and Los Angeles. The Dash is available for free by invitation to a limited number of consumers.

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