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Top UPMC executive leaving for Colorado health system

| Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 12:15 p.m.

A top executive at UPMC, a woman once viewed as a possible successor to CEO Jeffrey Romoff, is leaving Western Pennsylvania's largest hospital system to head a smaller academic health system in Colorado.

Elizabeth Concordia, president of UPMC's hospital and community services division, on Tuesday was named CEO of the University of Colorado Health System in Aurora. Her first day will be Sept. 2.

At UPMC, she has run the system's largest division, which operates 20 hospitals, has more than 36,000 employees and generates annual operating revenue of $7.4 billion, or about two-thirds of UPMC's total revenue of $11 billion.

In Colorado, Concordia, 50, will be responsible for a health system with five hospitals, 14,500 employees and $2.4 billion in annual revenue.

Concordia, whose $2.5 million in pay in 2012 was second only to Romoff's, said she wasn't looking to leave and was recruited for the Colorado job by a search firm.

“You should read my departure as nothing other than this is an opportunity to be a CEO” at another health system, she said. “These opportunities only come along every once in a while.”

Asked if Concordia was being groomed to succeed Romoff, UPMC spokesman Paul Wood said no one was designated by the board of directors as a No. 2 or successor to the CEO.

“Jeff Romoff is the president and CEO of UPMC and will be the president and CEO for the foreseeable future,” he said. “The board of directors has a very rigorous succession planning process for all positions, including the CEO.”

Romoff, 68, congratulated Concordia, according to a written statement.

“Liz has been a valuable member of UPMC's executive management team since joining our organization in 2001 and a critical component in the continual transformation of UPMC,” he said. “She has directed the division's significant growth, integration and success.”

During her tenure, Concordia oversaw the growth of UPMC's hospital division through acquisitions of community hospitals, which increased revenue by 250 percent and hospital admissions by 85 percent.

Concordia said she hopes to use her experience to “continue to build the system” in Colorado.

UPMC has not named a replacement, she said.

Concordia was selected to lead the Colorado system after an eight-month search.

“Liz is more than just a talented and experienced leader; she is someone who truly embodies the values and the vision of UCHealth,” Chairman Dick Monfort said in a statement.

Alex Nixon is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at 412-320-7928 or anixon@tribweb.com. Staff writer Luis Fábregas contributed.

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