TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Nestle plans Coffee-Mate capsules for Keurig

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

By Bloomberg News
Wednesday, July 2, 2014, 9:20 p.m.
 

Nestle SA plans to make Coffee-Mate branded capsules that are compatible with Keurig Green Mountain Inc. machines, bringing the world's biggest coffee maker onto a rival's system.

The two companies will start selling the capsules, known as K-Cups, in the fall, they said in a Business Wire statement today. The packs will come in original and French Vanilla flavors and include coffee and creamer.

Nestle, which gets about a fifth of its $100 billion sales from java, has struggled to grow Nespresso. The company this year introduced a new type of machine to appeal to Americans who prefer a larger cup of coffee than Europeans.

The move is an “example of Nestle looking to crack the U.S. single-serve market on multiple fronts after its Dolce Gusto system largely failed in a first step,” said Jon Cox, an analyst at Kepler Cheuvreux in Zurich.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Business Headlines

  1. Typewriters back in style, keeping repair shops busy
  2. Workarounds exist for battery woes
  3. Former athletes open businesses
  4. Password change can block hackers from wireless cameras
  5. North Dakota oil boom attracts crime
  6. Hard-hit worker wonders where the economic resurgence is
  7. Energy industry says it’s on top of methane leaks, but environmentalists want oversight
  8. Interest in hybrid, electric vehicles declines while gas prices fall
  9. Chevron laying off 162 workers from Moon-based unit
  10. $300K in wine bottles stolen from Napa Valley restaurant found in North Carolina cellar
  11. Apprenticeship programs fill gaps in American manufacturing