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Amazon vows to fight FTC on kids in-app purchases

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, July 3, 2014, 10:33 p.m.
 

Amazon said it is prepared to go to court against the Federal Trade Commission to defend against charges that it has not done enough to prevent children from making unauthorized in-app purchases.

The FTC alleged in a draft lawsuit released by Amazon that unauthorized charges by children on Amazon tablets have amounted to millions of dollars.

Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc. said in a letter on Tuesday to FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez that it had refunded money to parents who complained. It said its parental controls go beyond what the FTC required from Apple when it imposed a $32.5 million fine on the company in January over a similar matter.

Amazon's Kindle Free Time app can limit how much time children spend on Kindle tablets as well as require a personal identification number for in-app purchases, said Amazon spokesman Craig Berman.

“Parents can say — at any time, for every purchase that's made — that a PIN is required,” he said.

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