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GM engineer knew about switch's mechanical problems

| Tuesday, July 8, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

DETROIT — General Motors' deadly ignition switch flaws emerged from an effort to better its cars.

As the company began developing new small cars in the late 1990s, it listened to customers who complained about “cheap feeling” switches that required too much effort to turn. GM set about making switches that would work more smoothly, a GM switch engineer testified in a lawsuit deposition in 2013.

The switches, though, were too loose, touching off events that led to at least 13 deaths, more than 50 crashes and a raft of legal trouble for the automaker.

Former U.S. Attorney Anton Valukas, hired by GM in March to investigate the switch problems, told a congressional subcommittee last month that GM wanted each small-car ignition to “feel like it was a European sports car or something.” After years of lagging behind the Japanese, GM was eager to make better, more competitive small cars.

As it turned out, switches in models such as the Chevrolet Cobalt and Saturn Ion can unexpectedly slip from “run” to “accessory,” causing engines to stall. That shuts off the power steering, making cars harder to control, and disables air bags in crashes. GM says the problem has caused at least 13 deaths, but some members of Congress put the death toll near 100.

The problem led GM to recall 2.6 million small cars in February and forced the company to admit it knew about the switch troubles for more than a decade before taking action. It has touched off federal investigations and prodded GM to review other safety issues, leading to 54 recalls this year covering 29 million vehicles.

The Associated Press traced the history of the problem using Valukas' report, as well as a deposition of GM switch engineer Ray DeGiorgio that was released by a House subcommittee. The deposition was also released by lawyers suing GM, but DeGiorgio's comments were redacted in that version.

In a wrongful death case in Georgia, DeGiorgio testified that he started out trying to make the switches easier to turn. But he was consumed by electrical issues in the switch.

When the switch supplier, Delphi, pointed out tests showing the switches turned too easily, DeGiorgio told Delphi not to change them because he was concerned mechanical alterations would harm the switch's electrical performance, Valukas wrote.

Delphi spokeswoman Claudia Tapia said the company isn't commenting on the details of GM's recall.

In the end, DeGiorgio approved switches that were far below GM's specifications for the force required to turn them. The result was a smooth-turning key, but also one that could slip out of position. Several years later, DeGiorgio signed off on a design change that fixed the problem, but he didn't change the part number, which stymied later attempts to figure out what was wrong with the cars.

DeGiorgio was one of 15 employees dismissed by the company last month because of the recalls.

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