Share This Page

Instacart grocery service fits in 'share economy'

| Saturday, July 12, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

ATLANTA — Marcus Amison pushes his grocery cart through a cavernous Costco aisle stocked with bulk cleaning supplies and faces the typical shopper's problem — he can't find what he's looking for.

But Amison isn't your typical shopper. He wears the green, branded T-shirt of Instacart, a San Francisco-based grocery service that promises home delivery in as little as an hour.

Instacart is part of a growing “share economy,” in which people provide personal services, unused items or rooms in their homes for profit. Even as this emerging marketplace blossoms into what Forbes predicts will pass $3.5 billion this year, economists debate the effectiveness of an industry that adds thousands of jobs that pay little and offer no benefits.

Like Uber with car rides and Washio with laundry, Instacart uses mobile technology to connect buyers with people who'll do their shopping and deliver the goods. Orders are made online or through smartphones and relayed to shoppers. The customers save a trip to the store, shoppers get flexible jobs, and Instacart takes a cut for setting up the transaction.

Amison picks up a shrink-wrapped pack of Kosher Chicken Thighs and scans the bar code with his smartphone. He uses a company-issued credit card to finish the purchase that includes 12 gallon jugs of milk, which he loads into the back of his 2000 Dodge Intrepid.

“Might as well make some extra money when I can,” says Amison, who works as a full-time chef at the Marriott Marquis, but makes $15 to $20 an hour working 20 hours per week for Instacart.

The company was founded in 2012 by Apoorva Mehta, a former Amazon executive. It is in 12 cities and announced in June that it had received $44 million in financing from investors.

It is going to have to compete with a growing field of grocery delivery businesses, including Grab a Buggy and ColdLife Organics. On the horizon, Amazon Fresh and Walmart-To-Go are piloting similar programs on the West Coast. At stake is the $586 billion of total retail grocery sales last year, of which online orders represented less than 1 percent.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.