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Europe thirsts for U.S. craft beer

| Thursday, July 24, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
In this Saturday, July 19, 2014, photo provided by Stone Brewing Co., Stone Brewing Co. CEO and Co-founder Greg Koch, center, toasts the crowd after announcing the Escondido, Calif., brewery's plan to build a brewery and bistro in Berlin. Stone Brewing Co. is spending about $25 million to renovate a historic gas works building into a brewery, packaging and distribution center, restaurant and garden set to open late next year. Stone Brewing Co., one of the top 10 biggest craft breweries in the U.S., will make beer for its bistro and distribution throughout Germany and Europe.
In this undated photo provided by Green Flash Brewing Co., Alexis Briol, of Brasserie St-Feuillien in Belgium, left, and Green Flash brewmaster Chuck Silva, pour hop pellets into a batch of beer, in San Diego. Green Flash is making and selling fresh beer in the European market under a handshake deal with Brasserie St-Feuillien. Some of the nation’s largest craft breweries are setting up shop in European countries famous for defining age-old beer styles to help quench a growing thirst for American craft beer overseas.
In this undated photo provided by Green Flash Brewing Co., Alexis Briol of Brasserie St-Feuillien in Belgium, left, and Green Flash brewmaster Chuck Silva, inspect a bag of malted barley before brewing beer. San Diego-based Green Flash is making and selling fresh beer in the European market under a handshake deal with Brasserie St-Feuillien. Some of the nation’s largest craft breweries are setting up shop in European countries famous for defining age-old beer styles to help quench a growing thirst for American craft beer overseas.
This Saturday, July 19, 2014, photo provided by Stone Brewing Co. shows the historic gas works building that will soon house Stone Brewing Co.'s brewery and bistro in Berlin. Stone, based in Escondido, Calif., is spending about $25 million to renovate the building into a brewery, packaging and distribution center, restaurant and garden set to open late next year. The company is one of the top 10 biggest craft breweries in the U.S., and will make beer for its bistro and distribution throughout Germany and Europe.

RICHMOND, Va. — Helping to quench a growing thirst for American craft beer overseas, some of the United States' largest craft breweries are setting up shop in Europe, challenging the very beers that inspired them on their home turfs.

It's the latest phenomenon in the flourishing craft beer industry, which got its start by emulating the European brews that defined many of the beer styles we drink today. The move marks a continuing departure from the status quo of mass-market lagers or stouts, demonstrating a willingness of American breweries to explore — and innovate — Old World beer styles from Belgium, Germany and the United Kingdom.

The U.S. craft beer scene is so fresh and dynamic, Europeans are becoming as excited about it as Americans, says Mike Hinkley, co-founder of San Diego-based Green Flash Brewing Co. “Even though they're used to all these amazing European beers, now there's just more variety.”

U.S. craft beer exports grew six-fold during the past five years, jumping from about 46,000 barrels in 2009 to more than 282,500 barrels in 2013, worth an estimated $73 million, according to the Brewers Association, the Colorado-based trade group for the majority of the 3,000 brewing companies in the United States.

Of course, it's still a fraction of overall production; U.S. craft brewers produced a total of 15.6 million barrels last year.

Just last week, Green Flash became the first U.S. craft brewery to begin making and selling fresh beer in the European market under a deal with Brasserie St-Feuillien, a Belgian brewery founded in 1873. Under the watchful eye of Green Flash brewmaster Chuck Silva, the brewery is making and selling fresh West Coast IPA for distribution in the United Kingdom, Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Italy.

Five hundred miles away in Berlin, Stone Brewing Co. is taking a different approach to meeting overseas demand — spending about $25 million to renovate a historic gas works building into a brewery, packaging and distribution center, restaurant and garden set to open late next year or early 2016. Escondido, Calif.-based Stone, one of the top 10 biggest craft breweries in America, will make beer for its bistro and distribution throughout Germany and Europe.

“The idea that we're going to go across the pond, as it were, to brew our style of beers fresh in Europe is an exciting prospect for us,” said Stone CEO and co-founder Greg Koch, who announced the overseas expansion plans over the weekend. “When we started out at Stone 18 years ago, we were inspired by a lot of the European brewers ... and now to see an inspiration bounce back around the world, that's amazing.”

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