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Chrysler recalls up to 792K Jeep SUVs for ignition switch defect

| Tuesday, July 22, 2014, 8:48 p.m.

DETROIT — The ignition switch defects that engulfed General Motors are now a rapidly growing problem at Chrysler.

Chrysler said Tuesday it is recalling up to 792,300 older Jeep SUVs worldwide because the ignition switches could fall out of the “run” position, shutting off the engine and disabling air bags as well as power-assisted steering and braking. That's the same problem that forced GM to recall millions of cars during the past six months.

Chrysler's recall covers 2005-07 Grand Cherokees and 2006-07 Commanders. The company said it is not sure exactly how many will be recalled, but said it will notify customers by mid-September.

Chrysler has recalled more than 1.5 million vehicles for ignition-switch problems. In June, the company added 696,000 minivans and SUVs to a 2011 recall to fix faulty ignition switches. That recall covered Dodge Journey SUVs and Chrysler Town & Country and Dodge Caravan minivans from the 2007-09 model years.

Chrysler said an outside force such as a driver's knee can knock switches out of the “run” position. Engineers are working on a fix.

The Auburn Hills, Mich.-based automaker, part of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, said it knows of no related injuries and only one accident, and few complaints have been filed. It said owners should keep clearance between their knees and keys until repairs are made.

The recall is the outgrowth of two investigations opened by safety regulators last month as part of a broader probe into ignition-switch and air-bag problems across the industry.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said in June that it received 32 complaints that a driver's knee can hit the key fob or key chain, causing the ignition switch to move out of run and engines to stall.

The federal investigation is still open. The agency said Tuesday that it is still requesting information from Chrysler to ensure that its repairs will be effective.

The investigations and recalls come after GM bungled an ignition-switch recall of older small cars. GM acknowledged that it knew of the ignition problem for more than a decade but failed to recall the cars until earlier this year. That problem led to the recall of 2.6 million small cars such as the Chevrolet Cobalt. GM says at least 13 people have died in crashes caused by the problem, but lawmakers put the total closer to 100.

“The GM Cobalt recall brought to light new information that NHTSA will use in the future to evaluate stalling issues,” the agency said in a recent statement. “While there is no specific standard regarding ignition-switch torque and no standard regarding the amount of weight from key chains and keys that an ignition switch must be able to handle, NHTSA will continue to conduct research to determine additional improvements that can be made to the nation's fleet.”

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