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IBM chip inspired by human brain

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By Bloomberg News
Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

IBM's engineers have come up with a way computer chips can think more like humans.

International Business Machines Corp. said it has produced a chip that more closely replicates the way the human brain operates than traditional processors do. The new architecture is better at tasks such as image recognition in video data — which could be a new way to help computers sense movement. On top of that, the chip uses less energy than traditional designs.

If the design eventually turns into a product, it could help the processor industry, which is searching for new ways to make its products run computers faster. It's increasingly turning to new methods of trying to perform multiple tasks at the same time, since traditional designs that simply counted faster have led to overheating.

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