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2 top technology officers leave UPMC

| Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, 11:06 p.m.

UPMC lost two of its top technology officers in recent weeks as the largest health system in Western Pennsylvania deals with an investigation into a huge data breach that exposed employees' sensitive information.

UPMC spokeswoman Wendy Zellner said neither departure was related to the data breach.

Chief Information Officer Dan Drawbaugh, 55, resigned on Monday to pursue other professional interests, UPMC said on Tuesday. Rebecca Kaul, 36, chief innovation officer and president of the UPMC Technology Development Center in the Bakery Square in Larimer, resigned late last month.

Neither Drawbaugh nor Kaul could be reached for comment.

Their resignations occur as federal and local authorities investigate how hackers penetrated UPMC's internal payroll system for its 62,000 employees and may have accessed Social Security numbers and other personal data.

The departures of Drawbaugh and Kaul will have no effect on the investigation, Zellner said.

The hospital network, which is the state's biggest private employer, said the breach didn't impact patient information. It is providing free credit monitoring services to employees.

The investigation by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Pittsburgh, the Internal Revenue Service, Secret Service, Postal Inspection Service and police is ongoing, UPMC spokeswoman Gloria Kreps said.

As chief information officer for 18 years, Drawbaugh was in charge of all UPMC computer and record systems and was credited with “using sophisticated information technologies to enhance patient care and safety,” UPMC said.

Under his watch, the system was an early adopter of electronic health records, was named a Most Wired hospital for the past 16 years by Hospitals & Health Networks magazine and was ranked the most innovative user of technology across all industries by InformationWeek magazine in 2013.

Succeeding Drawbaugh on an interim basis is Ed McCallister, senior vice president of enterprise applications and business services.

Kaul, who is the daughter of UPMC CEO Jeffrey Romoff, started at UPMC in 2009 and established the Technology Development Center. The center grew to employ 200 tech workers and has developed a portfolio of health care-related information technologies.

According to her profile on LinkedIn.com, Kaul is working as a consultant. UPMC named Dr. Rasu Shrestha, vice president of medical information technology, to be interim president of the Technology Development Center.

Alex Nixon is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7928 or anixon@tribweb.com.

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