TribLIVE

| Business


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Security too risky with Java

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

Daily Photo Galleries

By Kim Komando Special For USA Today
Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

The weekly — sometimes daily — security scares that occur with the Java programming language are starting to remind me of the old whack-a-mole arcade game.

Researchers or hackers discover a major flaw in Java. Java's developer, Oracle, whacks it with a patch. Another mole pops up. Oracle whacks it with a patch.

Many experts say Oracle is losing this game or isn't trying very hard to win. And computer users are paying the price.

When a vulnerable version of Java is active in a web browser, visiting a compromised website is all it takes for crooks to sneak malware onto your computer. In most cases, you won't even know the site is compromised until it's too late.

Here's how to stay safe: Stop using Java — or stay on top of the upgrades and use Java a lot more guardedly.

I'm going to help you do just that.

But first: What the heck is Java? And why is it capable of scalding your computer?

First developed back in 1995, Java became ubiquitous almost overnight because it allowed programmers to write one program and use it on Windows, Apple OS X and other operating systems.

Today Internet browsers use Java for interactive web content, such as popular online games. Computers use it to run useful programs such as the free Office alternative LibreOffice, and Adobe Creative Suite. And Java is pre-installed on most systems. It's estimated that Java is running on 850 million computers in the world.

Java's security holes woke up Apple users last year when more than 600,000 Macs became infected with the Flashback malware that targeted Java.

Since then, moles have kept popping up through other holes. In response to the most recent exploit, the Department of Homeland Security a couple of weeks ago recommended that all Internet users disable Java. Apple and Mozilla have turned off Java plug-ins automatically in the latest editions of the browsers Safari and Firefox. But it doesn't hurt to double-check that Java is turned off.

Fortunately, the latest version of Java has a one-click button just for that purpose. That's handy because disabling it manually was a hassle, especially in Internet Explorer.

First, make sure you have the most recent version of Java from Oracle's site. The latest release as of this writing is Version 7 Update 11.

To bring up Java's new security settings, go to Start>>Computer and type “Javacpl.exe” in the search bar.

Mac users can find the setting by going to System Preferences and clicking on the Java icon — it looks like a steaming cup of coffee.

This will disable Java in your browser but still let you use it for desktop programs.

Warning: If you do head into your browser settings to check that Java is disabled, you might see something called JavaScript. Don't disable JavaScript! It's a different animal and has no security issues.

Although it's safer to run Java for a desktop program, it's best to get it off your machine if you don't need it.

Kim Komando hosts a talk radio show about consumer electronics. For details, visit www.komando.com.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Steelers use 3 late first-half TDs to stun Texans
  2. Rossi: Steelers’ season all about going big
  3. Rookie Bryant sparks deep passing game for Steelers in victory
  4. Steelers notebook: Adams replaces concussed Gilbert
  5. Harrison woman dead in 3-car crash in Natrona Heights
  6. Kin of 2013 DUI crash victim in Hempfield lose young family in fire
  7. Pittsburgh police officers start wearing video cameras
  8. Ferrante defense says arrest of prosecutor’s boyfriend could affect case
  9. Pa. Supreme Court Justice McCaffery suspended in email porn scandal
  10. Bortuzzo could provide much-needed physical presence for Penguins
  11. Natrona Bottling Co. keeps soda pop operation small, putting effort into craft, taste
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.