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Plants add color and interest to winter landscape

Doug Oster
| Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016, 8:55 p.m.
‘Oso Happy Smoothie’ is a tough landscape rose from Proven Winners ColorChoice Shrubs that has beautiful flowers in the spring, summer and fall. It also puts on a show in the winter with these hips or seed heads.
Courtesy of Proven Winners ColorChoice
‘Oso Happy Smoothie’ is a tough landscape rose from Proven Winners ColorChoice Shrubs that has beautiful flowers in the spring, summer and fall. It also puts on a show in the winter with these hips or seed heads.
This 'Cardinal' red twig dogwood is planted in a rain garden at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's one of the plants that executive director Keith Kaiser likes to use for winter interest.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
This 'Cardinal' red twig dogwood is planted in a rain garden at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's one of the plants that executive director Keith Kaiser likes to use for winter interest.
Heather is in bloom at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's a wonderful plant to add color in the garden during the winter.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Heather is in bloom at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's a wonderful plant to add color in the garden during the winter.
Keith S. Kaiser, executive director of the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden poses in a stand of 'Cardinal' red twig dogwoods which are planted in a rain garden near the Bayer Welcome Center. Red twig dogwoods are one of the plants he chooses for winter interest.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Keith S. Kaiser, executive director of the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden poses in a stand of 'Cardinal' red twig dogwoods which are planted in a rain garden near the Bayer Welcome Center. Red twig dogwoods are one of the plants he chooses for winter interest.
Heather is in bloom at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's a wonderful plant to add color in the garden during the winter.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
Heather is in bloom at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's a wonderful plant to add color in the garden during the winter.
‘Karl Foerster’ grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster’) is a good choice for the winter landscape as it has semi-evergreen foliage at the base and a very straight upright form growing three to four feet tall. This plant was part of the landscape at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
‘Karl Foerster’ grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster’) is a good choice for the winter landscape as it has semi-evergreen foliage at the base and a very straight upright form growing three to four feet tall. This plant was part of the landscape at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden.
This 'Cardinal' red twig dogwood is planted in a rain garden at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's one of the plants that executive director Keith Kaiser likes to use for winter interest.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
This 'Cardinal' red twig dogwood is planted in a rain garden at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. It's one of the plants that executive director Keith Kaiser likes to use for winter interest.
‘Karl Foerster’ grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster’) is a good choice for the winter landscape as it has semi-evergreen foliage at the base and a very straight upright form growing three to four feet tall. During a snowfall some of the tall stems will arch down under the wieght of the snow for a nice effect. ‘Karl Foerster’ grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster’) is a good choice for the winter landscape as it has semi-evergreen foliage at the base and a very straight upright form growing three to four feet tall. This plant was part of the landscape at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
‘Karl Foerster’ grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster’) is a good choice for the winter landscape as it has semi-evergreen foliage at the base and a very straight upright form growing three to four feet tall. During a snowfall some of the tall stems will arch down under the wieght of the snow for a nice effect. ‘Karl Foerster’ grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster’) is a good choice for the winter landscape as it has semi-evergreen foliage at the base and a very straight upright form growing three to four feet tall. This plant was part of the landscape at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden.
This oakleaf hydrangea called 'Sikes Dwarf' has great winter interest. The plant has dried flower heads, exfoliating bronze bark and burgundy leaves. There are a stand of them growing at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
This oakleaf hydrangea called 'Sikes Dwarf' has great winter interest. The plant has dried flower heads, exfoliating bronze bark and burgundy leaves. There are a stand of them growing at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden.
'Invincibelle Spirit II' is an indestructible hydrangea that will bloom reliably in winter climates. Once the flowers are spent, they have great winter interest. One dollar of sales of each plant goes to the Breast Cancer Reasearch Foundation.
Courtesy of Proven Winners ColorChoice
'Invincibelle Spirit II' is an indestructible hydrangea that will bloom reliably in winter climates. Once the flowers are spent, they have great winter interest. One dollar of sales of each plant goes to the Breast Cancer Reasearch Foundation.
‘Pink Hair Grass’ (Muhlenbergia capillaris) to the right grows in consort with lamb's ears at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. They are two plants that executive director Keith Kaiser likes to use for their winter interest.
Doug Oster | Tribune-Review
‘Pink Hair Grass’ (Muhlenbergia capillaris) to the right grows in consort with lamb's ears at The Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. They are two plants that executive director Keith Kaiser likes to use for their winter interest.

Red twig dogwoods and other plants can help get gardeners through the winter, by adding some color to the typically gray landscape. For more ideas on what to plant for winter interest, see Doug Oster's full story at everybodygardens.com.

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