Share This Page

Solutions both practical, creative found at annual Remodeling Expo

| Friday, Dec. 28, 2012, 8:58 p.m.
Patrons check out some painted glassware at the 2012 Pittsburgh Remodeling Expo. L&L Exhibition Management
There will be a variety of home related items on display at the 2013 Pittsburgh Remodeling Expo. L&L Exhibition Management

Joann Fullen and Ryan Robertson say their organizations will offer two different outlooks of planning at the Pittsburgh Remodeling Expo beginning Jan. 4.

While one topic leans to the creative and the other to the practical, both are vital elements in any home job.

Fullen, owner of a Penn Hills-interior design firm that bears her name, and Robertson, senior vice president and market manager at Fifth Third Bank's Downtown headquarters, say they will be offering examinations of ways of getting into projects.

The two topics fit the nature of the event, says Nick Vedder, show manager from L&L Exhibition Management of Minneapolis. He says the show will have 160 vendors who provide information on interior remodeling, but do not deal with exterior projects that are part of the bigger home-and-garden show in March.

Fullen will be joined by four other area members of the American Society of Interior Design Nancy Sakino Spears, Patty Ringo, Nancy Barsotti and Liz Murphy — to offer suggestions on projects and even one-on-one consultations.

Such planning is an obvious start to any project, but Robertson says Fifth Third staffers will look at financial preparation — which will allow the work to be done.

“Going to a bank when you are considering a home project may not be the first step you take,” Robertson says. “The show will allow a person to have a conversation with a banker to see what can be done.”

He says staff members will discuss the differences between equity and non-equity loans. Equity loans are built around the collateral a creditor has built up in a home.

Equity lines of credit allow a homeowner to have an amount of money available for projects, but Robertson realizes some people don't like putting another mortgage on the property.

“Equity loans are popular and have become a good tool, but, sometimes, they are not the right fit for everyone,” he says.

The bankers also will discuss matters of purchasing and refinancing homes, she says.

For design consultations, Fullen asks homeowners to bring floor plans and photos of each wall so the designers can get a good idea of what the room offers and demands. Besides the one-on-one talks, which will be about 15 minutes each, there also will be panel discussions with question-and-answer periods.

She also offers her own kind of financial warning: Money often plays a bigger role in home jobs than it sometimes seems on home-renovation TV shows.

“People in those projects talk about getting all these jobs without really discussing the money too much,” she says. “It's a reality show that really isn't.”

Bob Karlovits is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at bkarlovits@tribweb.com or 412-320-7852.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.