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Real estate notes

| Friday, Jan. 4, 2013,

• Plans for Mt. Ararat Baptist Church to use a three-story structure at 751 N. Negley Ave., East Liberty, as a community center will be discussed Thursday before the Pittsburgh Zoning Board of Adjustment. The plan includes nine on-site parking spaces and 19 off-site spaces at 5538 Stanton Ave. It was initially presented on Dec. 6. Also on the agenda, the Open Door Presbyterian Church will seek approval to build a one-story structure for use as a greenhouse at 527 Edlam Way, Garfield. Terrance Parker wants to use a one-story structure at 920 N. Lang Ave., Homewood, for retail sales and services.

• The Pittsburgh Urban Redevelopment Authority will seek $1 million from the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, under the Growing Greener Fund, for the Legacy 2.0 development in the Hill District. E. Properties & Development LLC plans a four-story, mixed-use building with ground-floor commercial and 224 residential units above. Cost is about $5 million.

• Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation's proposal to add the Renaissance Historic District to the National Register of Historic Places is being supported by Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton. He asked the National Park Service to give “highest consideration to the proposal.” The area includes more than 100 structures. As part of the National Register, buildings in the district would qualify for state and federal tax credits for redevelopment.

• Annie Hanna Cestra, chief operating officer of Howard Hanna Real Estate Services, has been sworn in as chairman of the board of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh. She had been as board member for eight years.

• Pittsburgh City Council will hold a hearing at 1 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers on a request to rezone Banksville Road between Banksville and Crane avenues for expansion of an Eat'n Park parking lot. The rezoning, from neighborhood industrial district and parks to highway commercial, involves 38,494 square feet. The meeting is on the fifth floor of the City-County Building, 414 Grant St., Downtown.

• Instant Imprints, a San Diego-based company that sells promotional items, plans to open at least four franchised operations in the region as early as this year, said Bryan Smith, senior vice president of East Coast franchise development. Targeted for sites are Washington and Greene counties and Monroeville and Cranberry. In three to four years, he anticipates having eight to 10 locations here. Instant Imprints shops usually contain 1,200 square feet and are one-stop promotional centers that offer screen printing, embroidery, wide-format printing and other services.

• Carload Express Inc. in Oakmont and its wholly owned subsidiary the Ohio Terminal Railway Co. will be involved in operations at the 12.1 mile Omal railway line in Monroe County, Ohio, with Hannibal Real Estate of White Plains, N.Y. Ohio Terminal will operate as a common carrier short-line railroad connecting with Norfolk Southern Railway. Carload's other short-line railroads are The Allegheny Valley Railroad, Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad and Camp Chase Railroad.

Sam Spatter is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7843 or sspatter@tribweb.com.

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