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Homework: 'New Kitchen Ideas'; Wagner paint sprayers; Westmoreland winter antique show

| Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, 8:58 p.m.
“New Kitchen Ideas That Work” by Jamie Gold.
“Why Grow That When You Can Grow This?” by garden designer and consultant Andrew Keys
Wagner
Wagner's PaintReady Sprayer is a handheld unit designed for midsize projects with larger surface areas, such as interior walls.

Author offers ‘New Kitchen Ideas That Work'

Some kitchens are beautiful. Some kitchens are functional. The best kitchens are both.

Those are the kitchens Jamie Gold highlights in “New Kitchen Ideas That Work.”

Gold, a kitchen and bath designer and an aging-in-place specialist, shares a wealth of ideas and information for creating the best kitchen for the money. Her suggestions cover everything from simple spruce-ups to full-scale remodels.

Gold helps readers determine the strengths and weaknesses of their kitchens, make style and design choices, develop a budget and hire help. She offers suggestions for layouts and features and schools her readers on elements such as cabinets, lighting and appliances.

“New Kitchen Ideas That Work” is published by the Taunton Press and is priced at $21.95 in softcover.

Wagner sprayers paint inside and out

Wagner has introduced two paint sprayers designed for use indoors and outside.

The PaintReady Sprayer and PaintReady System have a patented nozzle that requires no thinning of paint. They're quiet and lightweight and can be used with interior or exterior latex paint, stains and sealers.

The PaintReady Sprayer is a handheld unit designed for midsize projects with larger surface areas, such as interior walls. The PaintReady System has a stationary base that connects to either of two handheld sprayers, one with the same capabilities as the PaintReady Sprayer and the other for fine finishes.

Both products are available at some Home Depot stores and at www.homedepot.com. The PaintReady sprayer sells for $99.99 and the PaintReady System for $148.97. Shipping is free.

Winter antiques show to be held Sunday

The Westmoreland County winter antique show will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.

More than 30 antiques dealers will be selling items like vintage jewelry, sports memorabilia, linens, glassware, toys and military and railroad memorabilia.

The show is at the Greensburg Hose Co. fire station No. 1 at 7 McLaughlin Drive. Admission is $1. Early buyers can pay $8 to get in at 6 a.m. Details: 724-216-9200

Designer has garden tips with ‘Grow This'

Garden designer and consultant Andrew Keys believes a lot of garden problems can be prevented just by choosing the right plants.

That's the premise of his new book, “Why Grow That When You Can Grow This?”

Keys points out that many notoriously difficult plants have easy-care alternatives that resemble them closely. His book points out those problem plants and suggests what he calls “extraordinary alternatives.”

The book offers 255 alternatives for trees, shrubs, vines, perennials, grasses and ground covers.

“Why Grow That When You Can Grow This?” is published by Timber Press and is priced at $24.95 in softcover.

— Staff and wire reports

Send Homework items to Features in care of Sue Jones, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212; fax 412-320-7966; or email sjones@tribweb.com.

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