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How to practice safe mosquito control

| Sunday, May 26, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
mosquito

There are over 170 species of mosquitoes in North America, many of them carrying deadly diseases. The American Mosquito Control Association urges people to be aware of the harm that mosquitoes can cause and is offering tips for practicing safe mosquito control this spring.

“A mosquito needs as little as a teaspoon of standing water to lay its eggs,” association technical advisor Joe Conlon says. “Places like rain gutters, old outdoor buckets, tree holes and empty flower pots make excellent spots for breeding. Therefore, it's extremely important to eliminate these sources to help reduce the mosquito population around your home and your neighborhood.”

The association offers these tips for avoiding mosquitoes:

• Empty out water containers at least once a week

• Wear long sleeves, long pants, and light-colored, loose-fitting clothing

• Properly apply an approved repellent such as DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon-eucalyptus

• Dispose of old tires — tires can breed thousands of mosquitoes

• Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers to avoid water collection

• Clear roof gutters of debris

• Clean pet water dishes regularly

• Check outdoor toys and empty collected rain water children's toys

• Repair leaky outdoor faucets

• Change the water in bird baths at least once a week.

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