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Homework: Antiques sale; Drywall patches

| Friday, July 12, 2013, 7:32 p.m.
DAP's new Presto Patch simplifies structurally sound drywall repairs. The patch is a circle of half-inch-thick drywall with drywall taping paper attached. You cut out the damaged drywall using a template included with the product, insert the patch and adhere it with joint compound.
Patricia Ann tools

Drywall patch covers large holes

DAP's new Presto Patch simplifies structurally sound drywall repairs.

The patch is a circle of half-inch-thick drywall with drywall taping paper attached. You cut out the damaged drywall using a template included with the product, insert the patch and adhere it with joint compound.

The patch is intended for repairing drywall holes that are too big for simple spackling. It comes in two diameters, 3 78 inches and 6 78 inches.

The suggested retail prices for Presto Patch are $5.99 to $6.99 for the smaller size and $7.29 to $8.99 for the larger. DAP products are widely available at hardware stores, home centers and mass merchandisers.

Antiques show and sale in Hempfield

Another installment of the Antiques & Collectibles Show at Hanna's Town will take place at 7:30 a.m. July 14 on Forbes Trail Road in Hempfield.

More than 100 vendors will gather to sell antiques and treasures. Parking will be available on site for $3 per car. Proceeds will benefit the Salem Township Volunteer Fire Dept. No. 2 (Forbes Road) and the Westmoreland County Historical Society.

Antiques & Collectibles is the second Sunday of each month from May through September. The next and final market will take place Sept. 8. Vendors are welcome; call for guidelines.

Details: 724-532-1935 or www.hannastown.org

How to clean smelly drains

If you've got a smelly kitchen drain, there's probably bacteria growing in it.

To eliminate the problem, start by mixing a cup of baking soda and a cup of vinegar. Pour the mixture down the drain, let it sit for 15 minutes or more, then run the disposal and rinse with hot water.

To clean disposal blades, freeze white vinegar in ice-cube trays and let the disposal grind away at them. The ice will help dislodge stuck-on debris, and the vinegar will freshen the unit.

If there's still an odor, try pouring in half a cup of bleach, but not if you have a septic system. You may need to buy a live enzyme product that eats away bacteria, or a corrosive cleaner meant to unclog drains.

Author has tips on perfect house

Marianne Cusato believes finding the right house isn't about tallying up square footage and gushing over granite countertops. It's about figuring out how you want to live.

She helps house hunters do that with her new book, “The Just Right Home: Buying, Renting, Moving — or Just Dreaming — Find Your Perfect Match!”

Cusato is a home designer touted for her work on the Katrina Cottages, compact homes originally intended for people left homeless by Hurricane Katrina. She's also passionate about matching housing to needs, not just desires.

Her book helps readers figure out all the nuts-and-bolts issues involved in a home search, from determining whether renting or owning makes better financial sense to sizing up a street.

“The Just Right Home” is published by Workman and sells for $12.95 in paperback.

Garden tools for women

A Copley, Ohio, businesswoman has created a line of gardening tools designed for women's hands.

Pat Taylor developed a love of gardening from her mother, who dug in the soil with tools that didn't fit her small frame. To remedy that problem, Taylor called on knowledge she'd gained from her years as an employee and, more recently, co-owner of Barberton, Ohio's, Wright Tool Co. to start Patricia Ann Tools, a division of Wright.

The company makes a set comprising a trowel, cultivator, soil knife, weeder and pruner, along with a sun hat. All the tools have ergonomic grips and heavy-duty stainless-steel blades or prongs. The set sells for $89.95.

A tool caddy that fits a 5-gallon bucket is also available for $29.95.

Patricia Ann Tools can be ordered at www.patriciaann.com. Shipping is extra.

— Staff and wire reports

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