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Briefs: Butterflies, antiques and backyard clubhouses

| Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, 7:50 p.m.
Greensburg Garden Center
One of the butterflies released during last year's Butterfly Program at the Greensburg Garden Center.
Greensburg Garden Center
A butterfly finds an unlikely perch during last year's Butterfly Program and Greensburg Garden Center.

Garden center plans butterfly program

The Greensburg Garden Center will present its annual Butterfly Program at 1 p.m. Aug. 6 at the Greensburg Garden & Civic Center. Rick “The Butterfly Guy” Mikula will perform live, and afterward, 250 monarch butterflies will be released from the front lawn.

Personal butterflies can be reserved for $6 by calling ahead or emailing ggc951@live.com. Butterfly accoutrements will be available for purchase. Admission is free.

The garden center also is sponsoring a bus trip to the Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens in Akron on Sept. 18. The mansion is the former estate of R.A. Seiberling, co-founder of the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. The bus leaves at 7 a.m. and returns at 6 p.m. The cost is $70. Reservations are requested by Aug. 12.

Details: 724-837-0245 or www.greensburggardencenter.com

Antiques show in Somerset

The 43rd annual Somerset Antiques Show will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 10 on the streets of uptown Somerset.

The event usually draws about 5,000 visitors and will welcome dealers from three states this year. Antiques such as furniture, glassware, books and coins will be featured.

An appraisal fair will occur from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Somerset Trust Co. parking lot; there will be a fee per item appraised.

Admission is free, and the event will be held rain or shine.

Details: 814-445-6431 or info@somersetcountychamber.com

Antique gun show and sale

Guns, swords and other military accessories will be on display and available for sale at the ninth annual Harmony Museum Antique Gun Show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 10.

About 30 dealers and collectors will attend the event in the museum's Stewart Hall; the event will focus on the weapons that contributed to settlement of the “Ohio Country” and other important historical happenings.

Civilian and military long arms and pistols, with emphasis on the American longrifle, will be featured in the exhibits. Visitors are encouraged to bring items for expert appraisal. Admission is $5; proceeds benefiting museum operations.

Details: 724-452-7341 or www.harmonymuseum.org

Learn to build backyard clubhouse

Lee Mothes has such fond memories of building a childhood clubhouse that he wants other kids to have the same experience. So, he's sharing his know-how in “Keep Out! Build Your Own Backyard Clubhouse.”

The book is a how-to guide that young people and adults can use to build a backyard getaway. He teaches basic construction techniques such as pounding nails and sawing boards, describes helpful tools and walks readers through all the steps involved in design and construction.

Mothes encourages kids to be creative, scrounge for materials and build their clubhouses themselves, maybe with a little help from an adult. But he includes more complex instructions for a grown-up getaway that could be used for purposes such as a guest cottage, a studio or a potting shed.

“Keep Out!” is published by Storey Publishing and sells for $18.95 in softcover.

— Staff and wire reports

Send Homework items to Features in care of Sue Jones, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212; fax 412-320-7966; or email sjones@tribweb.com.

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