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Homework: Harmony antiques show; Wilkinsburg home tours; programs at Phipps

| Friday, Sept. 20, 2013, 8:57 p.m.
Albert Niko Triulzi
This house on Whitney Avenue is one of seven featured in the inaugural Wilkinsburg House & Garden Tour.

Wilkinsburg home tours

The Wilkinsburg Community Development Corp. will host its inaugural House & Garden Tour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 28.

The tour will include seven houses and gardens, two churches and Biddle's Escape, a coffee shop on Biddle Avenue. Highlights include a newly installed permaculture garden, large Victorian era homes with original architectural details and a restored 100-year-old house that was condemned just a few years ago.

A vendor area, including food trucks, will be set up on South Trenton Avenue.

Tickets are $18 the day of the tour and can be purchased at the tour check-in location, Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church, 905 Mifflin Ave. Get $3 off the tickets by ordering in advance at www.wilkinsburgcdc.org; enter coupon code “tour” at the checkout screen to receive the discount.

Details: 412-727-7855

Master Gardener courses at Phipps

Do you want to become a gardening expert? Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens is accepting applications for its 2014 Master Gardener training course. The classes run for six months, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Tuesdays beginning in January, at Phipps Garden Center in Mellon Park.

Applicants must attend the weekly classes, pass a series of competency exams and volunteer at least 36 hours over the course of the year to be certified the following year.

The application deadline is Oct. 1. If you are interested, contact Sarah Bertovich at 412-441-4442, ext. 3925, or sbertovich@phipps.conservatory.org.

Science presentations

On Sept. 27 and 28, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens will welcome five emerging scientists supported by its Botany in Action Fellowship program for two special events: Science Stories from the Field and Science Casual Conversations.

The events will highlight stories from the fellows' global adventures studying the relationships between people, plants, health and the planet. Both events are open to the public and included in the price of regular Phipps admission.

The fellows are engaged in research in locales from Pennsylvania to India, studying topics from the effects of heavy-metal pollution on plants and pollinators to the potential of traditional medicine to affect Parkinson's disease.

Science Stories from the Field will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 27 in Phipps' new Center for Sustainable Landscapes.

For Science Casual Conversations, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Sept. 28, the scientists will be stationed throughout the Tropical Forest Conservatory to display their research tools, answer questions and offer a glimpse into the world of field scientists.

Admission to Phipps is $15, $14 for seniors and students, and $11 for ages 2 to 18.

Details: www.phipps.conservatory.org

Antiques show

The Harmony Museum will present an antiques show and sale at its historic 1805 barn annex Sept. 28 and 29.

Primitives, jewelry, furniture, military items, glassware, toys, pottery, artwork and country items will be available.

The annex is at 3030 Mercer Road, Harmony. Admission is $3. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 28 and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 29.

Details: www.harmonymuseum.org or 724-452-7341

— Staff and wire reports

Send Homework items to Features in care of Sue Jones, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212; fax 412-320-7966; or email sjones@tribweb.com

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